Week 8 Post 13

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Feathers and Fur

Animal Rights

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Vegetarians remind me of pro-life fanatics, in that they can't seem to justify their actions without attacking meat-eaters. I have had a lunch partner for a number of years and up until a few months ago, we enjoyed rather nice lunch conversations. Now, the conversation turns to slaughterhouses, rotting meat, meat in the bowels, and other disgusting lunch conversation. It would be nice if we could merely go to lunch, he orders whatever he wants, I order whatever I want and he stops being so critical of my choices.

There may be many great reasons why we should all be vegetarians, but those are decisions that I would like to make by myself. I can respect his choice and my choice needs to be respected as well.

I believe my friend chose to become a vegetarian for health reasons (diet actually), but those who do it because of animal cruelty need to also consider wearing leather shoes/purses, wool garments, etc. It's not just the slaughterhouses for food that can be called bad.

Preparing a genealogical history of where my food comes from will be very interesting, but I'm not sure it will do anything as for my choice in food. For this report, I will track the history of tonight's dinner that consisted of the following: Pasta with Garlic Herb sauce; ground turkey, and French cut green beans. This scrumptious meal was prepared by my husband who is (was) unaware that I would select his dinner as the source for my report.

The Sauce:
Knorr Pasata Sauces; Garlib Herb Sauce Mix; 1.6 oz. Ingredients: Wheat Flour, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Corn Starch, Maltodextrin, Hydrolyzed Corn Protein, Salt, Garlic Powder, Whey Protein Concentrate, Dried Whey, Sugar, Lactose, Butter Oil, Herbs and Spices, Corn Syrup Solids, Citric Acid, Vinegar Powder, Sodium Caseinate, White Wine Solids, Dipotassium Phosphate, Guar Gum, Annatto and Turmeric (Color), modified Food Starch, Natural Flavor, BHT (To protect quality). [After reading all the ingredients, the parenthetical at the end is almost comical!]

The Pasta:
Anna Fettuccine6, Product of Italy. 16 oz. Ingredients: Semolina, Niacin, Ferrous Sulfate 9Iron), Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), and Riboflavin (Vitanin B2), Folic Acid.

The turkey:
We switched to ground turkey instead of ground beef for health reasons. The turkey lived its life on a turkey farm. Turkey farms are not a fun place to be if you are a turkey. There was a turkey farm just off the 605 Freeway and conditions there were sad at best. The turkeys seemed packed to overcrowding. I often wondered if they violated health codes. The odor reaches us before we ever saw the farm. The turkey is transported to a slaughterhouse where it is butchered and prepared for packaging.

By the time the turkey reaches our house it goes through a series of being choice cut, packaged and then shipped to the grocery store. I'm not sure how many days pass, but it doesn't seem like it's fast enough for my liking. When we buy the packaged turkey it's horrific life prior to us buying the pack is far from sight. To us it seems like nice choice meat that's ready for cooking.

I am aware of the beef process because my husband worked on a dairy ranch when he was a young boy. He used to tell me about the dairy cows, beef cows, etc. There is not way to make slaughterhouses look appealing. There's no doubt is gruesome and often disgusting.

The Research:
http://www.us.knorr.com/knorr/about.asp#Pasta%20Sauces
Knorr Pasta Sauces are authentic, restaurant-style alternatives to everyday red sauces. They're easy to prepare and they contain less fat than similar restaurant recipes. Try one of the "Quick Menu Tips" on the back of every package to turn your favorite pasta into a delicious, extraordinary meal.

http://www.pasta.co.uk/total_pasta/manufacturing/ is a website that describes how pasta is manufactured.

http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/1548.html

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/psychology/health_psychology/vegpage.html

http://www.nin.ca/Publications/Rapport/rapp1_98.html

http://www.metabolicdiet.com/supp_veg.htm

http://www.mercola.com/2000/mar/26/vegetarians_blindness.htm


Eating Dogs

Eating dog meat is something that is not part of American culture. There are cultures, however, where dog meat is considered a delicacy. Personally, I would find it repulsive because I associate dogs with domestic pets.

I eat foul, yet I own parrots. I recall one Thanksgiving Day when dinner guests asked to see my parrots. They inquired about what I fed them and I told that that dinner for them tonight would be exactly what we ate for dinner. With that, one of my guests proclaimed, "You mean they're going to eat their cousin!" Everyone in the room laughed. In a sense, what she said was true. There's not much difference between eating my feathered pet and eating a feather turkey.

I would say that we eat what we eat directly because of our culture. We are accustomed to eating beef and pork, and we are not accustomed to eating dogs and cats.